Activities

Take part in a tour of the museum park.

On the children’s activity farmyard you can try your hand at jobs that were once commonplace on a farm, such as pumping water and carrying buckets on a yoke.
At the children’s activity farmyard kids can see how animals live up close.

Ride a velocipede, play with hoops or have a go on a Vliegende Hollander, a traditional Dutch go-cart. It’s fun all the way on the Zaan Square.

At the farmhouse from Staphorst there are animals in the stall. You will find a cow in the deep-litter stall, a type of stall in which the old dung is left to build up.
At the farmhouse from Staphorst there are animals in the stall. You will find a cow in the deep-litter stall, a type of stall in which the old dung is left to build up.
Come and listen to the folktale of the ‘Witte Wieven’. This is an experience that will stimulate all your senses – excitement is guaranteed!
In the farmhouse from Kadoelen the eldest daughter cannot sleep. Watch the short film about poverty and begging.
At the children’s activity farmyard you can learn to knit using wool from the museum’s own sheep. This wool has been dyed using plants from the herb garden.
Enjoy some old-fashioned winter fun on the large skating rink in front of Amsterdam’s Westerstraat and on the snow-tubing run near the mill. Skates* are available to borrow free of charge.

In the 1980s winter sports were affordable and accessible for all.

 

The weaving team creates all kinds of colourful textile products for the Open Air Museum.

What could be more fun than baking a bread roll over a crackling fire! It tastes delicious too.

In the half-timbered barn syrup is made.

Moluccans who came to the Netherlands were likened to birds in a cage by their families in the Moluccas.

In the ‘cheese-cover farmhouse’ you will hear the compelling winter’s tale about fog.

On 31 July 1914 all Dutch soldiers were ordered to travel immediately to their garrisons. There were also soldiers stationed in Zeist.

How cold would it have been inside a peat cabin during the harsh winter of 1890? Try to imagine what it was like.

Step into the summer house and listen to Afro-Caribbean stories about the spider Anansi.

Pieces of cardboard laid out on the ground as insulation, a warm coat and a sleeping bag – Chahid and Peter use these items to make a place to slee